British Columbia

Orders and Guidance

Restart Guide
Foodservice Guide to Reopening
Return to Safe Work
Orders for Vancouver and Fraser Valley Health Regions

Dine-In

 

Premier John Horgan joined Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Minister of Health Adrian Dix to announce that the B.C. government will be instituting temporary, short-term circuit-breaker restrictions to mitigate the risk to the provincial healthcare system.

Effective as of 12:01am (March 30) until April 19:

  • Restaurants and licensed drinking places will be permitted to offer delivery, takeout and full-meal patio dining ONLY. Indoor dining will no longer be permitted anywhere in the province. Establishments will also no longer be permitted to serve only snacks or appetizers outdoors.
  • Whistler will be required to suspend its ski season.
  • Fitness centres and gyms will be required to close indoor activities, though outdoor training with a personal trainer (i.e. one-on-one sessions) may continue.
  • Indoor worship services will no longer be permitted.
  • All offices are advised to strongly encourage employees to work from home.
  • B.C. residents are advised not to travel outside their local communities for the duration of this circuit-breaker period.

WorkSafeBC will be conducting inspections to verify that COVID-19 Safety Plans remain effective. Establishments that are noncompliant with plan requirements may face orders and fines, and possible referral to public health which may result in a closure order.

Review the PHO Order – Food and Liquor Serving Premises (PDF)
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon

 

Employee PPE
  • PPE is necessary when physical distancing of 2 metres or physical barriers cannot be maintained by administrative and engineering controls.
  • Examples of PPE include gloves, eye protection (goggles or face shields), gowns, and face masks. Many industries have specific PPE standards they follow to ensure the safe operation of their settings and services.
  • Wait staff and servers should try to maintain two metres of distance from patrons wherever possible. When maintaining two metres of distance or using a physical barrier is not possible, servers should wear a face mask.
Employee Health Checks The provincial health officer and the BC CDC have issued the following guidance around self-isolation, which must be reflected in your policies:
  • Anyone who has had symptoms of COVID-19 in the last 10 days must self-isolate at home; symptoms include fever, chills, new or worsening cough, shortness of breath, sore throat and new muscle aches or headache.
  • Anyone under the direction of the provincial health officer to self-isolate must follow those instructions.
  • Anyone who has arrived from outside of Canada, or who is a contact of a confirmed COVID-19 case, to self-isolate for 14 days and monitor for symptoms.
Customer Health Checks/PPE The provincial health officer and the BC CDC have issued the following guidance around self-isolation, which must be reflected in your policies:
  • Anyone who has had symptoms of COVID-19 in the last 10 days must self-isolate at home; symptoms include fever, chills, new or worsening cough, shortness of breath, sore throat and new muscle aches or headache.
  • Anyone under the direction of the provincial health officer to self-isolate must follow those instructions.
  • Anyone who has arrived from outside of Canada, or who is a contact of a confirmed COVID-19 case, to self-isolate for 14 days and monitor for symptoms.
Sanitation
  • Provide adequate hand-washing facilities on site for all workers and ensure the location is visible and easily accessed. Develop policies around when workers must wash their hands, including upon arriving for work, before and after breaks, after handling cash or other materials, before and after handling common tools and equipment.
  • Implement a cleaning protocol for all common areas and surfaces, including washrooms, equipment, tools, common tables, desks, light switches, and door handles. Ensure those engaged in cleaning have adequate training and materials.
  • Remove any unnecessary tools or equipment that may elevate the risk of transmission, including items like coffee makers and shared utensils and plates.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Guests must maintain a 2 metres distance from other tables and other groups, including bar and patio seating.
  • There must be no more than six patrons seated at one table or booth or standing together, even if they belong to the same party.
  • There must be a distance of two metres between the backs of the seats of patrons seated at adjacent tables or booths, even if members of the same party are seated at adjacent tables or booths, unless the adjacent tables or booths are separated by physical barriers.
  • You must determine the maximum number of patrons that can be accommodated safely on your premises, taking into consideration the factors set out in paragraphs 1, 2, 3 and 4 and must document this maximum number in your safety plan.
  • You must monitor the number of patrons present on your premises and ensure that the number present does not exceed the maximum number in your safety plan.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing Yes: Click here for details
Other Operational Guidelines
  • Employers are required to develop a COVID-19 Safety Plan that outlines the policies, guidelines, and procedures they have put in place to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission.
  • This plan follows the six steps outlined below. Employers must involve frontline workers, joint health and safety committees, and supervisors in identifying protocols for their workplace.
  • Employers are not required to submit plans to WorkSafeBC for approval, but in accordance with the order of the Provincial Health Officer, this plan must be posted at the worksite.
  • During a WorkSafeBC inspection, we will ask employers about the steps they have taken to protect their workers or to see the plan if it has been developed.

 

 

Alberta

Orders and Guidance

Alberta's Staged COVID-19 Relaunch
Alberta's Relaunch Strategy
Alberta Phase Two Reopening Announcement
Guidance for Restaurants Cafes Pubs and Bars

Following up on the January 29 announcement of on-premise dining recommencing February 8, the Alberta Government has now posted
the Chief Medical Health Officer’s Order 02-2021 replacing Order 42-2020 which was implemented in December.


The Order outlines new step one COVID-19 reopening restrictions which have now been implemented. Restaurants and bars are covered
in Part 6 of the Order.

Here is the Alberta CMOH Order 02-2021.

Dine-In

The Alberta government announced that it is moving back into Step 1 of COVID-19 restrictions to mitigate the risk to the provincial healthcare system.

Effective as of noon on Friday, April 9: Restaurants will be restricted to providing only takeout, delivery and patio service.

Read the Alberta government's official press release for more details.

Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE
  • PPE is necessary when physical distancing of 2 metres or physical barriers cannot be maintained by administrative and engineering controls.
  • Examples of PPE include gloves, eye protection (goggles or face shields), gowns, and face masks. Many industries have specific PPE standards they follow to ensure the safe operation of their settings and services.
  • Wait staff and servers should try to maintain two metres of distance from patrons wherever possible. When maintaining two metres of distance or using a physical barrier is not possible, servers should wear a face mask.
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
Sanitation Notify attendees of the steps being taken to prevent the risk of transmission and the importance of their roles in these measures.
  • COVID-19 signage should be posted in highly visible locations: “Help prevent the spread” posters are available.
  • When possible, provide necessary information in languages that are preferred by attendees.
  • Thoroughly sanitize each table after patrons leave.
  • Washroom capacity should allow for distancing between guests. For example, consider closing alternate urinals.
  • Washroom sanitation and supervision should be enhanced.
  • Staff should perform hand hygiene frequently.
  • Common touch devices, including digital ordering devices, bill presenters, self –serve beverage stations and touch-screen mobile ordering kiosks, must be regularly cleaned and disinfected.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Dining parties may be up to 6 patrons; no more than 6 individuals are allowed to sit at larger tables.
  • Diners should be reminded that it is recommended that only members of the same household or cohort family be seated together at a table.
  • Arrange tables and chairs so that a two metre distance is maintained between each dining party.
  • Aisles should be wide enough to allow room for people to maintain physical distancing. Consider using one-way traffic flow to help maintain distancing.
  • Physical barriers should be installed where tables cannot be adequately separated. For example, heighten barriers between.
  • Wait staff and servers should try to maintain two metres of distance from patrons wherever possible. When maintaining two metres of distance or using a physical barrier is not possible, servers should wear a face mask.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
    Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
    Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
    Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing Yes: Download the app, click here.
Other Operational Guidelines
  • Remove table condiments and other frequently touched items (for example, salt and pepper shakers, ketchup, hot sauce).
  • Consider keeping music to a low volume to help patrons avoid leaning in to hear one another.

 

 

Saskatchewan

Orders and Guidance

Reopen Saskatchewan
Downloadable Guide

Here are the links to the updated restaurant restrictions information and Restaurants and Licensed Establishments Guidelines.

Dine-In
  • Seating must be arranged in a way that ensures at least two metres of physical distancing between tables where physical barriers are present and three metres where physical barriers are absent.
  • Only members of the same dining party can be seated together. A maximum of four people can be seated together at the same table. Larger groups will have to occupy more than one table while maintaining physical distancing between tables.
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE
  • Physically distancing of two metres (six feet) is always the first choice for protection from other staff or customers. For staff that cannot always physically distance two metres, the use of non-medical masks or face coverings is required by Public Health Authorities. Operators should supply this equipment.
  • Whenever possible, staff must maintain two metres of separation from other staff and customers. However, physical distancing in certain work environments may be difficult, such as kitchens. If staff are unable to maintain two metres away from coworkers, other actions may be necessary, including self-monitoring of personal health, supervision.
  • Glove use is not required nor recommended. If staff are using gloves, they must be changed after every interaction, as well as when changing tasks. Hand hygiene must be performed between every glove change, this includes hand washing with soap and water or an alcohol-based.
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
  • It is recommended that facilities review their employee illness policies to ensure staff are able to remain home when ill (as is required). Facilities are encouraged to have plans in place for increased worker absences due to illness or isolation.
  • Workplaces should have a workplace illness policy. If policies do not exist or are not in line with COVID-19 recommendations, workplaces should ensure that all sick employees must stay home or be sent home from work.
  • If employees go home sick, their work areas and any areas they had contact with must be cleaned and disinfected.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
Sanitation The COVID-19 virus can survive for several days on different surfaces and objects. Frequent cleaning and disinfection is important to prevent the spread of the disease.
  • Maintain a cleaning schedule and ensure staff are adequately assigned and trained for additional cleaning, sanitizing and disinfection duties to help reduce transmission of COVID-19.
  • Place an alcohol-based hand sanitizer approved by Health Canada (DIN or NPN number) in dispensers or soap and water hand washing stations near doors, pay stations, washrooms and other high-touch locations for customers.
  • Customers should be encouraged to wash or sanitize their hands prior to and following eating.
  • Increase cleaning and disinfection of commonly contacted areas, including doorknobs, handles, counters, chairs, payment machine terminals and/or self-pay stations, and light switches. Common touch areas include those 52 accessed by customers and employees.
  • Thoroughly clean and sanitize tables after each customer. Tablecloths must be removed and discarded or laundered between customers. Any food contact surfaces must be sanitized as per the Provincial Public Eating Establishment Standards (100 ppm bleach, 200 ppm QUAT) or immediately rinsed following disinfection.
  • Remove common touch items from tables, including condiments, salt, pepper, napkin holders, menus and special displays/decor.
  • Utensils should be used to serve food items (not fingers).
  • Menus must be cleaned and disinfected between each customer. If menus cannot be cleaned and sanitized (e.g. paper menus) they must be discarded after use. Where possible, consider using alternative menus instead of traditional menus, such as digital menu boards, online menus, large chalkboards or online pre-ordering.
  • Ensure employee and public washrooms are cleaned and disinfected with increased frequency, are always well stocked with liquid soap and paper towels, and that warm running water is available.
  • Garbage bins should be emptied frequently.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Seating must be limited to 50 per cent of maximum capacity and set up in a way to maintain two metres of physical distancing between dining parties.
  • Physical barriers should be installed where tables cannot be adequately separated. For example, raised barriers should be installed between adjoining booths.
  • Only members of the same dining party should be seated together. A maximum of six people can be seated together at the same table. Larger groups will have to occupy more than one table, while maintaining physical distancing between tables.
  • Aisles must be wide enough to allow room for people to maintain physical distancing. Consider using one-way traffic flow to help maintain distancing.
  • Operators must promote physical distancing wherever possible – for customers and staff – including waiting areas, bar seating, food pick-up areas and payment lines.
  • Use physical line controls when possible, such as crowd control cordons at entrances and pick-up lines. Place markers (e.g. tape or cones) every two metres as visible cues to support physical distancing.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing
  • Not applicable
Other Operational Guidelines
  • Not applicable

 

 

Manitoba


Orders and Guidance

COVID-19 Resources
Restoring after COVID-19
Restrictions in specific areas

Dine-In
  • As of March 5 at 12:01 am - Under the new rules, the capacity limit for restaurants and licensed premises will increase up to 50%.
  • All other restrictions will remain in effect, including the requirement for tables to be seated only with members of the same household. Establishments are required to verify ID that shows every diner’s address, to ensure that all adult patrons who are dining together are from the same household.
  • Patrons now have the option of providing ID, or signing a declaration that they reside in the same household.
  • The government has provided a Customer Table Log template that can be used for contact tracing, as well as for customers to sign as a declaration, which can be downloaded at: gov.mb.ca/asset_library/en/covid/customer_log_covid.pdf
  • Updated resources, including posters and table cards, are also being developed. Restaurant operators are encouraged to visit the Manitoba government’s COVID-19 resources web page over the coming days to access these resources
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE
  • Personal protective equipment (PPE) should be used on the advice of an organization’s occupational health and safety officer/designate and is based on a risk assessment that considers both the risk associated with a specific task/activity as well as the characteristics of the source of the infection (e.g. a sick person or a contaminated environment).
  • PPE must be used in combination with physical distancing, hand hygiene and other control measures.
Employee Health Checks
  • Assign employees who are at increased risk of serious illness from COVID-19 (such as people with a weakened immune system, living with a chronic disease or aged 60 years or older) to job tasks that lowers their risk of exposure.
  • Review sick-leave policies and requirements for medical (sick) notes to encourage employees to stay home when ill.
  • Ensure emergency contact information is current for all employees.
  • Emphasize that employees must stay home if they are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19 (such as cough, fever, runny nose, sore throat, breathing difficulties). Information about what employers can do to help employees who are experiencing symptoms can be found at: https://www.gov.mb.ca/asset_library/en/coronavirus/workplace_responsibilities.pdf
  • Encourage employees and volunteers to remain current with information related to COVID-19 by regularly accessing www.manitoba.ca/COVID19.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
Sanitation
  • Ensure there is a routine regime in place for overall sanitation of the workplace, including frequently cleaning and sanitizing washrooms.
  • Discard equipment, instruments and/or materials that cannot be disinfected between patrons and sanitize shared surfaces, tools and equipment before/after use as well as in between users.
  • Regularly clean workstations and objects with disinfectants that are touched frequently, such as doorknobs, handles, elevator buttons and railings. This includes regularly disinfecting electronic devices (such as phones, tablets, laptops and payment devices) with an alcohol (70 per cent) wipe. Businesses are encouraged to increase the frequency of cleaning workstations and worksites to at least
  • two times per day.
  • Provide cleaning supplies for employees to clean and disinfect their workspaces.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Occupancy limits of 50 per cent of normal business levels remain, as long as tables and seating are arranged so that there is at least a two-metre separation between persons sitting at different tables.
  • Restaurants may reopen patios and indoor spaces at 50 per cent capacity, as long as tables and seating are arranged so that there is at least a two-metre separation between persons sitting at different tables.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Encourage cashless or no-contact payment to the greatest extent possible.
  • Close public-use items, such as water fountains, onsite snack bars, coffee bars and other confectionery style counters.
  • Install plexiglass or other form of physical enclosures or barriers to separate employees and patrons, particularly in instances where a two metre distance cannot be consistently maintained. use.
Contact Tracing
Other Operational Guidelines
  • Dance floors and other common activity areas, such as pool tables, dartboards and video lottery terminals are to remain closed.

 

 

Ontario

Orders and Guidance

COVID-19 Response Framework: Keeping Ontario Safe and Open

The full list of public health region classifications is available at: www.Ontario.ca/covidresponse

Restaurants Canada has created an easy-to-use chart to help foodservice businesses navigate the public health measures required where they operate. Establishments must comply with all measures up to and including the level assigned to their jurisdiction.

Dine-In

In response to the province's now high and rising number of COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, ICU admissions and the increasing proportion of highly transmissible variants of concern, the Ontario government has announced that it is imposing a provincewide "emergency brake" for at least four weeks to mitigate the risk to the provincial healthcare system.

As of Saturday, April 3, 2021 at 12:01 a.m., Ontario's current COVID-19 Response Framework will be paused and the new emergency brake measures will come into effect. These measures include prohibiting all indoor and outdoor dining across the province. Restaurants, bars and other food or drink establishments will be permitted to operate takeout, drive-thru and delivery only.

Foodservice Vaccination Updates
Employee PPE
  • The Government of Ontario has introduced a new requirement for eye protection for workers who are within 2 metres of patrons without face coverings. This means that servers will be required to have eyewear or a face shield if serving customers who are unmasked.
    • Where possible, wear gloves when interacting with high-touch areas. Do not touch your face with gloved hands. Take care when removing gloves. Ensure you wash your hands after removing them.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
    • Sanitize often, between each transaction if possible.
    • Wash or sanitize hands after making or receiving deliveries.
    • Physically distancing of two metres (six feet) is always the first choice for protection from other staff or customers. For staff that cannot always physically distance two metres, the use of non-medical masks or face coverings is required by Public Health Authorities. Operators should supply this equipment.
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
  • Most municipalities require customers to wear face masks when not eating, please refer to this link for more details
Sanitation
  • Provide ways to properly clean hands, by providing access to soap and water or alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Provide cashiers, drive-through operators, delivery staff and other customer-facing staff with hand sanitizer for their use only.
  • Have all employees and visitors wash their hands thoroughly with soap and water before entering the workplace and after contact with surfaces others have touched.
  • Include handwashing before breaks and at shift changes.
  • Provide a safe place for customers to dispose of used sanitizing wipes and personal protective equipment.
  • Clean washroom facilities.
  • Sanitize commonly-touched surfaces or areas such as entrances, counters, washrooms and kitchens.
  • Sanitize shared equipment (where sharing of equipment cannot be avoided).
  • Post hygiene instructions in English or French and the majority workplace language so everyone can understand how to do their part.
  • Introduce more fresh air by increasing the ventilation system’s air intake or opening doors and windows. Avoid central recirculation where possible.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Establishments must take appropriate measures to ensure physical distancing of at least two metres between patrons from different households, including:
    • Using reservations.
    • Limiting number of patrons allowed in the outdoor space at one time.
    • Ensuring enough space between tables, including to allow for movement.
    • Add floor markings and barriers to manage traffic flow and physical distancing.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing
  • Contact tracing resources, click here
  • In Toronto: This is the most expansive requirement. Previously, operators were required to take a name and phone number for one person in each dining party. Under the new by-law, this information must include:
    • Name, email address, and phone number
    • Date
    • Party check-in and departure time
    • Party’s table number or location
This information must be available at the request of the Medical Officer of Health and must be stored for 30 days and then destroyed In addition, operators must display a sign at all entrances informing patrons of the collection of the information and the reason for it. Toronto PHU has not provided a template for this sign but is working on one.
Other Operational Guidelines All employers must post and communicate COVID-19 policies to workers.
These policies should cover how the workplace will operate, including, but not limited to:
  • The sanitization of the workplace
  • How workers report illnesses
  • How to ensure physical distancing
  • How work will be scheduled
  • Screening measures

Quebec


Orders and Guidance

March 16, 2021, Project Bill 87, An Act to limit certain costs in the restaurant industry was passed.

4 regions of Quebec change to red as of 8 p.m. Thursday, April 1, including two regions with very strict measures ("dark red").

Dark red zone  **Current measures extended to April 19, 2021**

Cities : Quebec City, Lévis, Beauce, et Gatineau

Measures

The government is reinstating the very restrictive measures that were in place in January.

The very strict measures of the two "dark red" regions will be in place until at least April 19.

Red Zone

Regions with preventive measure: Montréal, and Laval 

Regions under surveillance : Lanaudière, Laurentides and Montérégie

New measures

  • Travel to yellow zone prohibited 
  • Curfew goes back from 9:30p.m. to 8p.m. (Montreal and Laval)

Orange Zone

Regions: Saguenay–Lac-Saint-Jean, Mauricie Centre-du-Québec, and Abitibi-Témiscamingue

Region under high surveillance: Estrie

New measures

Travel to yellow zone prohibited 

Dine-In

Starting on March 26 (with exceptions – underlined below), some measures/restrictions will be adjusted:

Yellow zone

  • Regions that will turn yellow: Gaspésie-les-Îles, Côte-Nord, Nord-du-Québec
  • The curfew will be lifted
  • Restaurants: Dining rooms open (see sanitary measures below), delivery, take-out orders and drive-thru service allowed at all times.
  • Others: Back to full-time in-person class (high school 3-4-5) on March 22, 2 families will be able to meet in a household, and sports with contact will be allowed up to 12 people (details to come).

Orange zone

  • The curfew remains at 9:30 p.m.
  • Restaurants: Dining rooms open until 9 p.m. (see sanitary measures below), and delivery permitted during curfew.
  • Others: Back to class full time (sec. 3-4-5) on March 22.

Red zone

  • The curfew will pass at 9:30 p.m. on March 17.
  • Restaurants: Dining rooms closed, delivery permitted during curfew.
  • Others: Auditoriums and theatres open, 25 people allowed in places of worship.
Reminder of sanitary measures for restaurants
  • Dining rooms (in yellow and orange zones)
  • Open, with a maximum of 2 adults from a different address (no maximum for adults from the same address) per table who can be accompanied by their children.
  • A customer register must be kept. Only guests with proof of residence in the region of ​​the establishment can access it. With the exception of fast food, reservation is required.
  • During the curfew period (in orange and red zones), only delivery is possible.
  • Sanitary measures
  • Until 9 p.m. in the orange zone (since the curfew is at 9:30 p.m.)
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE
  • Physically distancing of two metres (six feet) is always the first choice for protection from other staff or customers. For staff that cannot always physically distance two metres, the use of non-medical masks or face coverings is required by Public Health Authorities. Operators should supply this equipment.
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
  • It is recommended that facilities review their employee illness policies to ensure staff are able to remain home when ill (as is required). Facilities are encouraged to have plans in place for increased worker absences due to illness or isolation.
  • Workplaces should have a workplace illness policy. If policies do not exist or are not in line with COVID-19 recommendations, workplaces should ensure that all sick employees must stay home or be sent home from work.
  • If employees go home sick, their work areas and any areas they had contact with must be cleaned and disinfected.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
Sanitation

Ensure efficient operation and maintenance of the ventilation systems, according to the regulatory requirements for the type of facility and the tasks performed;

  • Clean the sanitary facilities at least every shift and disinfect them daily;
  • Clean the meal areas before each meal and disinfect them daily. For example:
    • the refrigerator door handle,
    • chair backs,
    • microwaves;

Clean the frequently touched surfaces at least every shift and when they are visibly soiled. For example:

  • tables
  • counters
  • doorknobs
  • faucets
  • toilets
  • telephones
  • computer accessories
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Seating must be limited to 50 per cent of maximum capacity and set up in a way to maintain two metres of physical distancing between dining parties.
  • Physical barriers should be installed where tables cannot be adequately separated. For example, raised barriers should be installed between adjoining booths.
  • Only members of the same dining party should be seated together. A maximum of six people can be seated together at the same table. Larger groups will have to occupy more than one table, while maintaining physical distancing between tables.
  • Aisles must be wide enough to allow room for people to maintain physical distancing. Consider using one-way traffic flow to help maintain distancing.
  • Operators must promote physical distancing wherever possible – for customers and staff – including waiting areas, bar seating, food pick-up areas and payment lines.
  • Use physical line controls when possible, such as crowd control cordons at entrances and pick-up lines. Place markers (e.g. tape or cones) every two metres as visible cues to support physical distancing.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing
  • N/A
Other Operational Guidelines
  • N/A

Newfoundland and Labrador

Orders and Guidance

A Guide to Living with COVID-19

Pandemic Update

The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador has revised guidelines for Restaurants and Lounges reopening Alert Level 3.

Effective midnight March 12, 2021, restaurants and lounges in areas outside of the Avalon peninsula move to Alert Level 3: Restaurants may reopen at 50% capacity, provided that patrons at adjacent tables are seated at least two metres (six feet) apart.

Bars and lounges remain closed. One change is that masks are now required when seated, except when eating or drinking. Further information can be found here.

Dine-In
  • Restaurants can open for in-person dining at 50 per cent capacity as long as physical distancing can be maintained between patrons seated at adjacent tables. Buffets are prohibited.
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Restaurant workers who have direct contact with the public and cannot work from home during Alert Level 5 are eligible for phase 2 vaccinations
Employee PPE

Community face masks (for non-healthcare organizations)

  • Have employees wear medical PPE for health-care settings, when required, and non-medical cloth face coverings to protect others, where necessary.

Goal: Protect against the spread of COVID-19 by staying up to date and following guidance for community masks.

Employee Health Checks

All workers must self-monitor for symptoms and stay home if they are sick.

  • Employers should have plans in place for increased worker absences due to illness or self-isolation requirements.

All businesses should have a workplace illness policy. If a policy does not currently exist or does not align with COVID-19 recommendations the following should be included:

  • Sick employees must stay home or be sent home from work;
  • For employees housed in workplace accommodations (i.e., work camps), sick employees must be confined to their rooms until cleared for re-entry into the workforce;
  • Sick employees must use the self-assessment tool for COVID-19 and follow the subsequent directions; and, When employees go home sick, their work areas must be cleaned and disinfected.

Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entering and prior to their meal.
Sanitation
  • Washrooms may be open to staff and the public, but increased cleaning and disinfection must take place. Ensure employee and public washrooms are always well stocked with liquid soap and paper towels, and that warm running water is available. Contactless garbage bins should be available and emptied frequently.
  • Table cloths and napkins should be discarded if disposable or properly laundered between customers if re-usable.
  • Use digital menu boards, large chalkboards, or online pre-ordering alternatives instead of traditional menus. If this is not possible, consider single-use disposable menus or sanitize plastic menus between customers.
  • Remove salt and pepper shakers, sauce dispensers, candles, and other tabletop items. Provide only if requested and replace with thoroughly cleaned and sanitized ones. Consider single-use options. Anything that cannot be cleaned and sanitized after use should not be at the table.
  • Tables, chairs, cheque presenters and any non-disposable item an individual touches/uses should be sanitized in between customers
  • Don’t touch beverage glasses or cups when refilling. Consider providing refills in new cups only.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Workplaces are exempt from the limitations on the number of people in gatherings; however, the physical distancing of two-metres (or two arm’s lengths) between individuals should be maintained as much as possible.
  • Operations may need to be altered or postponed to maintain physical distancing.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • The use of electronic payment devices is preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing
Other Operational Guidelines
  • Buffets and other self-serve options (such as hot dog displays, shared condiment dispensers, ice cream bars) are not permitted.
    Spaces and recreation areas that promote a congregation of patrons, including but not limited to children’s play/activity spaces, dance floors, and karaoke areas are not permitted.
    Multi-use crayons/supplies are not permitted. However, Video Lottery Terminals (VLTs) are permitted (see below).

New Brunswick

 

Orders and Guidance

NB COVID-19 Alert Levels
NB Covid Recovery Level Comparison

New Brunswick restaurateurs are reminded that they are required to have a written Operational Plan that is accessible to to staff.

Dine-In Licensed premises such as a bar or restaurant must ensure all patrons are seated at all times, except to enter and exit the premises and to go to and from washrooms.
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE

Community face masks (for non-healthcare organizations)

  • Have employees wear medical PPE for health-care settings, when required, and non-medical cloth face coverings to protect others, where necessary.

Goal: Protect against the spread of COVID-19 by staying up to date and following guidance for community masks.
Guiding questions to get you started:

  • Does your business/service already have guidelines that require mask use?
  • Have you checked for any updates for new measures during COVID-19?
  • Are you aware of current recommendations on community mask use?
  • In your setting, consider whether you may need to go beyond current recommendations for community masks to best address public health measures? (e.g., where physical distancing poses challenges).


Employee Health Checks
  • Active or passive screening of employers and patrons.
  • You should advise any staff and patrons who are either symptomatic, and/or have been advised by Public Health to call TeleCare 8-1-1 to report their symptoms, self-isolate, remain home and not enter the premise.
  • You should also actively pre-screen staff before the beginning of each shift by using the Screening Questionnaire for COVID-19. In addition, posting information on COVID-19 symptoms such as a fever above 38°C, a new cough, or worsening chronic cough, headache, sore throat, runny nose, a new onset of fatigue, a new onset of muscle pain, diarrhea, loss of sense of taste, loss of sense of smell, and, in children, purple markings on the fingers and toes, will help to enable and reinforce passive screening of patrons.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Active or passive screening of employers and patrons.
Sanitation
  • Ensure that all common areas are cleaned and disinfected twice daily, or more often as required. As an example, items such as countertops, chairs (including below the front of the seat), rental/shared equipment, cashier equipment, light switches, public washrooms, door knobs, and furniture will need to be disinfected more frequently throughout the day.
  • Regular household cleaners, disinfectant wipes or a diluted bleach solution can be used according to the label directions. Use disposable gloves when cleaning surfaces.
  • Make sure that other staff and patrons are removed from the area during clean-up
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Patrons and staff must not be permitted to congregate in groups. Patrons must always maintain a minimum of two metres between themselves and others, with the exception of members of the same household or “bubble”. This may result in alterations to how your workplace is set up, how activities would normally occur, or how patrons and staff would normally interact and go about business.
  • Where possible, a designated staff member should monitor adherence to physical distancing requirements. Situations where close contact cannot be avoided might deserve special considerations for mutual protection such as installing a plexiglass screen at the cash or another type of physical barrier.
  • Community masks or other forms of protection may be used as a last resort. In elevators, limit the number of people getting into each car to no more than two at a time. People should consider only riding the elevator with their own family, taking the stairs, or waiting for the next elevator.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, always ensure regular handwashing and have minimum 60% alcohol-based hand sanitizer readily available.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
Contact Tracing

Active Screening in Red and Lockdown Zones
The Government of New Brunswick has issued clarification to Active Screening protocols for areas of the province that are in the red or lockdown alert level. These include Zone 1 (Moncton) and Zone 4 (Edmundston).

FOR PATRONS
Where patrons may enter any place where the public is welcome, proprietors and managers are required to:
Actively screen all who enter,
Actively manage the number of patrons permitted in the facility to ensure COVID-capacity limits as outlined in the operational plan are respected
Make all reasonable efforts to ensure that patrons maintain 2m of physical distancing with others who are not in their bubble
Ensure that all who enter are continuously wearing a face covering, and maintain 2m of physical distancing with other who are not in their bubble
Ensure all who enter sanitize their hands before entry in addition to all other guidelines of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB.

FOR EMPLOYEES
Where patrons may enter any place where the public is welcome, proprietors and managers are required to:
Actively screen all who enter,
Actively manage the number of patrons permitted in the facility to ensure COVID-capacity limits as outlined in the operational plan are respected
Make all reasonable efforts to ensure that patrons maintain 2m of physical distancing with others who are not in their bubble
Ensure that all who enter are continuously wearing a face covering, and maintain 2m of physical distancing with other who are not in their bubble
Ensure all who enter sanitize their hands before entry in addition to all other guidelines of the Chief Medical Officer of Health and WorkSafeNB

ACTIVE SCREENING
Active screening means that the workplace must assign resources to ensure that anyone entering the facility is asked the necessary screening questions. The questions may be asked one at a time by the screener, or the screening questionnaire can be made available to the person entering the facility, such as posting it, and the workers or patrons who are entering can read and provide their responses to the screener. For greater clarity, in certain commercial operations such as restaurants, it may be suitable for a single worker behind a counter to actively greet patrons, contractors and authorized visitors, and ensure all other public health requirements are met before any person may proceed beyond the initial screening point. If control measures to respect capacity limits as outlined in the operational plan are required, additional resources may be necessary to manage this.

For employees, contractors and permitted visitors entering the workplace, the screener must also record the name, time and date of entry. These records must be maintained for 28 days. The screener must also ensure that the workers and patrons entering the facility are wearing a face covering that covers their nose and mouth, and that they follow all other public health guidelines, including physical distancing and disinfecting hands before entry. For more information on active screening, read WorkSafeNB’s guide.

EN: Collection of names and contact information under the Mandatory Order COVID-19
FR: Collecte de noms renseignements en vertu de l’arrêté obligatoire lié à la COVID-19

Changes were also made to the mandatory contact tracing log to add date and time. Operators are now required to keep the name, date, time and phone number or email for at least one person per party.

Government has also announced that anyone entering New Brunswick from another province (including Atlantic Canada) must self-isolate for 14 days.

Other Operational Guidelines Other measures in the new restrictions include:
  • Non-residents will no longer be permitted to enter New Brunswick to visit family or property that they own.
  • Further evaluation is ongoing; additional measures may be needed.
  • Cases in all zones, although zones 1, 3 and 5 predominate. This, coupled with two new COVID variants and an extended vaccine timeline, require action to reduce risks to New Brunswickers, their daily lives and our economy.

 

 

Nova Scotia

Orders and Guidance

Reopen Nova Scotia

As of March 19, 2021, the government of Nova Scotia announced that restaurant restrictions have been loosened effective Saturday 8AM and licensed establishments are allowed to serve until 11:00PM with establishments closed at midnight.

Event gatherings have also been loosened with event venue limits increased to 100 up to 50 percent of capacity. 

Effective Friday 8:00AM March 5th hours of service for licensed restaurants will be increased to 10:00PM with patrons exiting by 11:00PM.  Travel in and out of Halifax is now allowed.

Dine-In

Under the new Emergency Order all restaurants in Nova Scotia must abide by the following restrictions:

  • Maximum table size will be 10
  • Liquor service must stop at 10:00PM with patrons leaving by 11:00PM
  • There are no capacity limits other than maintaining a minimum physical distance of 2 metres (6 feet) or a physical barrier between tables, booths and single seats.
  • Restaurateurs are required to maintain a log containing the name and email address/phone number of at least one patron per party.
Foodservice Vaccination Updates
  • Coming soon
Employee PPE

Masks asks can be a commercial non-medical mask or a homemade mask that covers your nose and mouth. A face shield cannot be worn instead of a non-medical mask. Face shields protect your eyes, but don’t protect other people.

Non-medical masks should:

  • Allow for easy breathing
  • Fit securely to the head with ties or ear loops
  • Maintain their shape after washing and drying
  • Be changed as soon as possible if damp or dirty
  • Be comfortable and not require frequent adjustment
  • Be made of at least 2 layers of tightly woven material fabric (like cotton or linen)
  • Be large enough to completely (and comfortably) cover the nose and mouth without gaping

Non-medical masks shouldn’t:

  • Impair vision or interfere with tasks
  • Be made of non-breathable materials
  • Be made of plastic, unless there are at least 2 layers of tightly woven material fabric (like cotton or linen) surrounding the plastic, without gaping
  • Be secured with tape or other inappropriate materials
  • Be made exclusively of materials that easily fall apart, such as tissues
  • Be shared with others
  • Have exhalation valves.
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
  • Voluntary testing will also be available for bar and restaurant staff in Halifax for a period of 7 days beginning the week of November 23, 2020. Information on this testing will be available soon.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entrance and prior to their meal.
Sanitation
  • Keep your workplace clean.
  • Clean and disinfect workspaces (a minimum of twice a day, or as required). Pay special attention to high-touch surfaces like doorknobs, light switches and railings, and commonly used areas such as tabletops.
  • Wash with soapy water first. Then disinfect using household cleaning products, following the directions on the label, or a solution of 5 mL of bleach per 250 mL of water, or 20mL per litre.
  • Disinfect phones, remote controls, computers and other handheld devices with 70% alcohol or wipes.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Stay 2 metres (6 feet) away from other people as much as possible, unless you’re in your group of 10.
  • Keep your group of 10 consistent, as much as possible.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing

RECORDS FOR CONTACT TRACING
What is the requirement for bars and restaurants to collect contact information?
All full-service restaurants and licensed establishments in Nova Scotia must collect names, contact information, and date and time of visit for each household or person that dines in/is seated at the establishment. This is for contract tracing purposes.

Do all bars and restaurants need to collect contact information?
This requirement applies to full-service restaurants and licensed establishments where patrons sit at tables to be served. It does not apply to staff at take out or fast food establishments.

How much information do they need to collect for contact tracing purposes?
They must collect accurate contact information each household or person, including date and time of visit, name and phone number. Nothing more is required, and nothing more is appropriate from a privacy perspective.

What do you mean by each household or person?
If everyone at the table lives in the same household, then just one name and phone number needs to be collected for that household. If everyone at the table is from a different household, every single person’s name and phone number needs to be collected. If it’s a mix (for example, 5 people who live together and 5 who all live separately), one name/number from each household and the names and numbers of each of the others must be collected.

How long do establishments need to keep these records?
This data must be retained for 4 weeks from date of visit for contact-tracing purposes.

Is there an end date for this requirement?
There is no end date for this requirement.

Who do they send the records to?
They only need to provide the records if public health asks for them. If that happens, they need to provide them in an electronic format.

Where can I find the contact tracing app for restaurants and licensed establishments?
A contact tracing app was developed to help restaurants and licensed establishments collect customer contact information. They can find it at http://www.rans.ca/contact-tracing.

Is it illegal to give false contact information?
Yes. A person can be fined at least $1000 for giving false contact information. You can use this poster in your establishment to help communicate that message to your customers: https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/docs/limit-10-per-table-poster.pdf.
Government has also produced a poster to inform customers of a 10 person maximum table size.
https://novascotia.ca/coronavirus/docs/limit-10-per-table-poster.pdf.

Other Operational Guidelines
  • To reopen, sector associations representing businesses and organizations that were required to close under the Health Protection Act Order must develop and comply with a Workplace COVID-19 Prevention Plan for their sector. Public Health is meeting with sector associations to share public health principles and provide information to help them develop their plans.
  • Plans need to show how the sector will comply with the Health Protection Act Order and public health directives (including social distancing) and ensure the safety of employees and customers.
  • Sector associations representing businesses and organizations that were required to close need to submit their plans to government for approval (send plans to nseconomy@novascotia.ca).
  • The Government is implementing a broad asymptomatic testing strategy for people who go to or work in late-night bars and restaurants.
  • As part of this plan, anyone who works in a licensed establishment or went to a bar or restaurant in after 10 p.m. in the last two weeks should book a COVID-19 test, even if they don’t have symptoms. People who work in or have been to a bar or restaurant in urban and suburban HRM in the last two weeks are asked to schedule a test.
  • This applies to all bars and restaurants open late and serving alcohol in HRM (except the areas east of Porters Lake), and the Enfield and Mount Uniacke areas in both HRM and Hants County.

 

Prince Edward Island

Orders and Guidance

Renew PEI Together
Food Establishment Guide to Reopening
The New Normal

Dine-In

The PEI government has eased public health restrictions for the Island. Beginning Saturday, March 13 at 8:00 a.m., the following measures will be in place in-person consumption of food and drink at restaurants and bars can have a maximum table size of 10 and must close by 12:00 am.

There is a limit of 50 people in these establishments with an additional three groups of 50 permitted with an approved operational plan.

Foodservice Vaccination Updates
Employee PPE
  • Physical barriers should be in place where the two-metre (six feet) physical distance between tables is not possible. (e.g., heighten barriers between booths).
  • If work activities mean that physical distancing cannot be maintained at all times, employers are strongly recommended to require the use of masks as an additional measure.
  • Physically distancing of two metres (six feet) is always the first choice for protection from other staff or customers. For staff that cannot always physically distance two metres, the use of non-medical masks or face coverings is required by Public Health Authorities. Operators should supply this equipment
Employee Health Checks
  • Implement a pre-work screening “health check” for employees at the beginning of each shift which may include temperature checks.
Customer Health Checks/PPE
  • Government of PEI announced that non-medical masks will be mandatory in all public places including restaurants. Masks can be removed to eat or drink but must be worn in common areas including halls and washrooms. This new measure is effective beginning 12:01 AM Friday, November 20 continuing until February 15, 2021 unless something significant changes.
  • Implement policies and post signage where customers can be refused entry if displaying signs of fever and/or cough, or symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Customers are required to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer upon entering and prior to their meal.
Sanitation
  • Develop and establish hand hygiene policies and procedures for all staff members. Post handwashing signs near all sinks.
  • Establish hygiene practices that address the needs of the workplace that includes the requirement to wash or sanitize hands after coming into contact with public items, such as an ID when verifying a person’s age.
  • Have hand sanitizer (with 60-80% alcohol) available to patrons and staff members. Install additional dispensers as needed.
  • Tables, vinyl or laminated menus, and seats should be cleaned and sanitized when tables turn. Remove all items when turning a table.
  • Establish cleaning procedures for condiments and other items brought to the table or available for sharing. Ensure they are cleaned and sanitized between uses.
  • Clarify procedures for cleaning staff areas and train accordingly.
  • Clean bathrooms thoroughly and on a more frequent basis. Install additional touch-free soap and paper towel dispensers, if possible.
  • Enhance cleaning of all frequent touchpoints including walls, tables, chairs, barstools, coasters, condiments, coat hooks, restrooms, doors including the front door, restroom door, staff doors to office, kitchen, and breakroom.
  • Develop a cleaning schedule and assign and train a staff member who is responsible for completing cleaning tasks and ensuring these tasks are completed.
  • Create a process to track what has been cleaned, when, and by whom.
Distancing and Occupancy Restrictions
  • Physical distancing (2 metres/6 feet) must be maintained between patrons at different tables as well as for patrons at the bar or in the waiting area(s).
  • This applies to both indoor and outdoor (patio) seating areas.
  • The maximum number of patrons per table is six.
Changes to Payment Systems
  • Use of electronic payment devices are preferred when possible. However, if you must handle money, ensure that employees are practicing effective hand hygiene after each instance by washing their hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 per cent alcohol.
  • Do not touch your face after handling money. Ensure that hand hygiene supplies are available for both patrons and staff at the point of purchase.
  • Limit the exchange of papers (e.g., signing contracts). If documents must be exchanged, leave them on a clean surface while maintaining a two-metre distance.
  • Avoid sharing pens and office equipment. Disinfect after each use.
Contact Tracing
Other Operational Guidelines
  • N/A